Who Trusts Thysse With Their Brand?
– Oregon Community Bank

The need for a corporate rebranding is usually a realization that comes from within the organization. Perhaps it starts with a logo that has begun to feel dated – a mark that doesn’t translate well to modern website and social media platforms – a mark that doesn’t properly reflect the company’s self-image. Perhaps it starts with an evolution of the company’s message and direction. Perhaps it starts with a new, energized vision of the company’s future. For Oregon Community Bank, all of these things occurred at about the same time and in 2014 they wondered …

Where do you go? How do you begin?

Oregon Community Bank turned to the branding team at Thysse. We began with a thorough examination of the existing visual brand elements, and OCB’s future plans. We then organized a series of Thysse-led employee charrettes in which we guided internal discussion focused around exposing the existing company culture and visions for the stakeholders’ outward messaging.

Thysse used this information to develop a complete rebranding that better fit an overall “Feel Good Banking” message and community mission. The finished deliverables not only included all visual identity assets (logo, typeface, color palette, print collateral, interior and exterior signage), but established the brand family for future OCB community branches.

“We were not only impressed with the end result, but the process in which Thysse employed during our rebranding process. They made it a truly collaborative effort by coming to us and leading sessions that drew out our thoughts, wants and needs. Thysse then took what we said and made it real. In the end, they effectively encompassed who we are as a bank and who we are as a brand. Simply put – success.”
Elyse Smithback, Vice President at Oregon Community Bank

About Thysse

Thysse (tie • see) is a branding agency / design studio with in-house printing and manufacturing capabilities. We are focused on innovative ideas, exceptional design and the physical production of ideas.

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